In a previous post, I’d covered how to use Kube-cert-manager to automatically create and update TLS certificates from LetsEncrypt.org. Kube-cert-manager was, even then, not seeing a lot of activity and Jetstack’s cert-manager was the project to watch/follow. Given that it was still early days with cert-manager, I used Kube-cert-manager. In the last 6 months, cert-manager has moved quite a bit forward. Also, LetsEncrypt now supports wildcard certificates. Today, I decided to give it a spin and was pleasantly surprised.

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Couple of weeks ago my ancient 10 year old Viewsonic 19" LCD monitor started going bonkers…​ Wouldn’t switch on properly - the standby light would just blink. Initially I suspected a contact problem and re attaching the cables seemed to do the trick - the monitor would come up and it would be fine until I swtiched off again. It seemed to be an intermittent problem so not much I could do besides do.

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We got the kids a Lego Mindstorms set last week. I’ve been eyeing it for quite a few years, but have been waiting for the kids to grow up a bit till they can handle it - especially since LEGOs are costly in general and the Mindstorms kit in particular costs a pretty penny. Anyway, they’ve been having a blast building our first robot - for now with LEGO’s android app over a Bluetooth connection.

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While I’d sort of an idea in terms of where Rancher fits in the ecosystem as a cluster management solution, I hadn’t played with it. Also, 1.x of rancher had it’s own orchestration engine and so on and I wasn’t that interested. Fast forward to 2017 and Rancher is putting it’s weight being Kubernetes and going all in. Rancher 2.0 was announced in Sep last and has followed up with a stream of RCs and moved to beta.

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I don’t know about you but while I’m pretty comfy with git cli for most routine operations, there are a few things that I do like a GUI for - most notably going through git history. Like most of you, I have an alias in my ~/.gitconfig to show logs on one line [alias] lg = log --graph --pretty=format:'%Cred%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset' --abbrev-commit --date=relative --date-order While this is usually enough, it’s not for cases when I need to search through history for commits touching a specific file or having some specific word/regex.

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I’ve finally set up backup of the different servers at home and in a way that I’m actually satisfied. In the past, it had been just rsync scripts.. needless to say, that it wasn’t working out that well and so things stood. and so things stood. Last week, I was thinking of giving Gnome a try out - I prefer KDE and run KDE Neon user edition on my main machine.

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So I’m stuck on windows 8.1 on my work machine - not that I mind too much.. It’s just too much work to set up the machine from scratch. However, windows 10’s WSL and docker for windows support using HyperV was something I wanted to give a spin. With Azure now supporting nested virtualization, I set up a dev machine on azure on the Dv3 SKU’s and set up minikube on it.

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Recently, I ported a large-ish codebase to .Net core. As part of that, one thing to deal with was continuous integration and continuous delivery. As Kubernetes was the platform of choice, I was looking into options that would let us: Deploy any branch, tag, pull request etc easily. Be able to host multiple app installations side by side. The first was easily solved with creating a Helm chart.

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Introducing Vim-Ghost Always hated typing long text in browser text areas? How about posting at reddit or stackoverflow and feeling like pulling your hair out in frustration while posting text with code or just editing markdown? Wished for having the full power of (n)vim while editing browser text areas? Then here’s a plugin that’ll go a long way towards answering those wishes! Figure 1. Here’s vim-ghost in action along with the GhostText browser plugin If you were a It’s all text user on Firefox, then you probably know that it’s dead and the author suggests the GhostText plugin.

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Eventstore on Azure Container Services At work, Ryan shared this post about getting Eventstore running on Google Cloud Platform (GCP) to try out on Azure. Now for those of you who don’t want to read the entire other blog post, what it talks about is setting up a Eventstore cluster in two ways Cluster using Pod local storage - where if the pod goes down, you lose all data and when Kubernetes brings up another pod, it will have to catch up.

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